Pneumatic Pnews

Monday, May 15, 2006

Tech Force optics: Built to a higher standard

by Tex Force

Is there anybody left who doesn't know that nearly all riflescopes are made in China? This has been true for decades.

It began in the 1970s
In the '70s, Europeans had a booming economy and labor costs soared. Remember, many of these countries struggled after World War II, and for nearly a decade after the war it was pretty much "Anything for a buck." People were hungry and in need of basic necessaries, so they sold their labor cheap. But eventually businesses rebounded and began to prosper and there was no looking back.

Lens-grinding moves from art to industry
For a long time, certain German, Austrian and Swiss manufacturers had a lock on the optical market. Their products were so good that often they were as heavily advertised as the items they were in - for example, Zeiss camera lenses in non-Zeiss cameras. But in the 1960s, labor costs began putting pressure on manufacturers. Fortunately for them, the lens-grinding machinery had improved to a high degree, making it possible to send machines to other countries where labor was still cheap and hungry.

Japan was a center for optics in the 1950s and 60s, but they, too, surged ahead and their labor costs increased. However, in other parts of Asia, the cost of labor did not rise nearly as fast. So in the 1970s both Europe and Japan began exporting their manufacturing capability to China and the surrounding region.

Lens-grinding moves from art to industry
As the lens grinding machines became more capable, the level of training and experience the operator needed decreased. Automation took the place of experience. This allowed the exportation of lens-grinding to countries with lower levels of industrialization. China, having a nationalized economy, used this infusion of technology to further her military industrial base. And that is where Compasseco comes into the picture.

Compasseco found the BEST Chinese companies
When Compasseco decided to move into optics they realized that all Chinese factories were not capable of producing at the same level. While other American scope manufacturers were contracting with companies that had found them at the SHOT Show and IWA, Compasseco turned the process around. They went to China looking for the best optics factory, rather than accepting a factory who had found them by chance at U.S or European trade shows. They settled on a maker of Chinese military optics, so they were assured of quality at the military specification level, not the commercial level! That's why Tech Force optics are head and shoulders better than other brands costing the same.

Better specifications
But a good maker isn't the whole story. You can choose the level of materials used in your optics, so Compasseco raised the standards for optical glass and lens coatings. They found the cost of better materials was not much higher, yet it resulted in a product that was clearly superior to the competition. That's a big reason why Tech Force optics are among the sharpest on the market at almost any price.

The first project was the Tech Force 96 red dot sight (eighth item down on the page), but once the contract was running smoothly, the line was quickly expanded to scopes, as well. A Tech Force sight means great quality at an affordable price.

9 Comments:

  • Tex,
    are the TF scopes all one reticle? I noticed that they don't speek of any other reticles for their scopes. Are you going to do another blog about them? let me know.
    sav300

    By Blogger sav300, at 8:38 PM, May 15, 2006  

  • Tex,
    also if you put the gun on sand bags or a vice rest it could do better or not. Some of these springers that are out are very, very picky. I have one that has to be shot free hand and another that likes to be held anyway. Some are just strange. But the pellet selection is my fist thought on bad accuracy, then loose parts, off set optics, too high of mounts, and finally how you hold it.Check all of these and let me know. My gun will not be in stock until 5/25/06. I hate waiting that long. I hope it goes fast.
    sav300
    P.S. Nice blog you posted.

    By Blogger sav300, at 8:52 PM, May 15, 2006  

  • sav300,

    I didn't have any plans to do more postings on Tech Force scopes. What do you have in mind?

    The reticles on the four TF scopes I have are all the same - a duplex with a small center area. This is a hunting reticle.

    By Anonymous Tex Force, at 5:00 AM, May 16, 2006  

  • Tex,
    I was wondering if they were going to expand their varity of reticles for their scopes. How about a blog on reticle choice for certian things(hunting, targeting, etc.). That would be a good blog.
    sav300

    By Blogger sav300, at 3:37 PM, May 16, 2006  

  • sav300

    Sounds good to me.

    Tex

    By Anonymous Tex Force, at 4:49 PM, May 16, 2006  

  • Tex,
    alrighty then, I'll look foward to it. Sorry about the delay with letting you know whats wrong with your gun. I had to cancel my order from Cobra Air and order it from Compasseco. I am so much happier with compasseco. Two more questions, what times and what are there to hunt during the summer? I normaly shot magpies steeling my dog's food and rabbits when I come across them. Let me know.
    sav300

    By Blogger sav300, at 8:46 PM, May 16, 2006  

  • Tex,
    I forgot to ask, do you know of a way to change a blued barrel to a nickle one? I would like to customize my TF99 into a nickle action & barrel and also put a custom stock on her too. I would prefer it to be a do it yourself deal. Any info is appriciated.
    Thanks,
    sav300

    By Blogger sav300, at 9:36 PM, May 16, 2006  

  • Tex,
    Where you at? You havent been on in a while just curious.
    sav300

    By Blogger sav300, at 10:14 PM, May 19, 2006  

  • sav300,

    To nickle-plate your TF99, you will have to disassemble it, then take it to a plater who can do the job. Tell him all the internal sections must be masked to avoid any plating buildup, as that would ruin the gun (no room for it!).

    I expect the job will cost $200-400 when it's all done.

    Summer is pest-hunting season. Magpies are fine, as are most corvids (crows, etc.) Find a place to shoot rats and you're in hunter's heaven. And don't forget insects! You can pass many days shooting grasshoppers and wasps.

    Tex

    By Anonymous Tex Force, at 6:24 AM, May 23, 2006  

Post a Comment

<< Home